Title: My Story
Author: David Pelzer
ISBN: 0752864017
Rating: 3/5

Synopsis:
All three of the books that chronicle the horrific abuse suffered by David Pelzer as a child, and his survival against the odds.

Review:
A Child Called “It”:
As a child, Dave was brutally beaten and starved by his emotionally unstable, alcoholic mother: a mother who played tortuous games – games that almost killed him. With only his willpower to survive, Dave learned how to play his Mother’s sinister games in order to survive because she no longer considered Dave a son but a slave, and no longer a boy but an “It.”

The harrowing true story of David Pelzer was the third-worst case of child abuse on record in the entire state of California. If that’s so, you have to wonder about just how horrendous the other two cases were because it’s amazing he ever survived to adulthood.

The Lost Boy:
As a child, Dave Pelzer was brutally beaten and starved by his mother. The world knew nothing of his living nightmare and he had nothing and no one to turn to. But his dreams kept him alive – dreams of someone taking care of him, loving him and calling him their son. Finally, his horrific plight could no longer be hidden from the outside world and Dave’s life radically changed. The Lost Boy is the harrowing – but ultimately uplifting – true story of a boy’s journey through the foster-care system in search of a family to love. The continuation of Dave Pelzer’s story is a moving sequel and inspirational read for all. Essentially, The Lost Boy is a story of regeneration and resilience.

A Man Named Dave:
The third tale in David Pelzer’s autobiographical trilogy, A Man Named Dave is an inspiring story of terror, recovery and hope experienced by the author throughout his life. Known for his work as an advocate against child abuse, Pelzer has been commended by several US presidents and international agencies, and his previous memoirs of growing up as an abused child (A Child Called It and The Lost Boy) have touched thousands of lives. He provides living proof that we can “stop the cycle” and lead fulfilling, rewarding lives full of healthy relationships.

It has been a little while since I read the first part of this trilogy, but as it was so harrowing, it has stayed fresh in my mind, so I was able to pick up where I left off. Pelzer’s story remains one of the most horrific child abuse cases in living memory and his never-ending search for answers is heartrending. Being able to follow his life story through to a conclusion of any kind (he’s still alive and well, so his story is not done just yet!) makes this a satisfying read and the sheer amount of work he has done towards helping others in similar situations is an inspiration. This really is a must-read trilogy, if only so we never forget what can and does happen in families all over the world, and work towards ensuring that it stops.